All about $q and Promises in Angular

You’ve seen $q, maybe used it but haven’t uncovered some of the awesome features $q provides such as $q.all() and $q.race(). This article dives into ES2015 Promise API and how it maps across to $q for AngularJS. This post is all about $q, enjoy!

Writing Less Damn Code

Writing Less Damn Code 16 Aug 2016 · Share on Twitter I’m not the most talented coder in the world. No, it’s true. So I try to write as little code as possible. The less I write, the less there is to break, justify, or maintain. I’m also lazy, so it’s all gravy. (ed: maybe… continue reading

Guide to Color on the Web

There are a lot of ways to work with color on the web. I think it’s helpful to understand the mechanics behind what you’re using, and color is no exception. Let’s delve into some of the technical details of color on the web.

Drop Caps by CSS3 and cross-browser ways

Drop Caps Cross-browser way (extra markup) Just wrap the first character of the paragraph in a span, then target the span with CSS and style away. <p> <span class=”firstcharacter”>L</span> orem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Mauris tristique lobortis orci ac lacinia. Fusce eu purus eget diam vehicula auctor nec eu elit. Morbi consequat… continue reading

CSS Counters drag-and-drop demonstration

CSS counters allow you to number items in CSS using dynamic numbering, similar to how an ordered list works. But CSS counters are quite different. This feature uses a pseudo-element combined with some counter-specific CSS to append/prepend a dynamic “count” to a specified set of elements.

jQuery Plugins for HTML responsive tables

HTML tables have a bad reputation. In the 1990’s and 2000’s, many web professionals would use tables for positioning text and images on web pages. Using tables for layout is bad, but unfortunately that message sometimes is shortened to “tables are bad,” which is not true at all. HTML tables should not be used for positioning on… continue reading

CSS3 :not selector and specificity

The negation pseudo-class, :not, can be incredibly useful. It allows us to target elements based on what attributes they don’t have, rather than what they do. This helps us avoid writing extra, increasingly specific, rules in an attempt to override previous ones. A common example of this is when we want to apply a style… continue reading